Financial Overhaul Bill and Real Estate

Our congress successfully passed new laws, courageously recomposing century-old U.S. fiscal principles. It seems our friends in D.C. have obtained great financial know-how, unseating 80 decades of financial thought in one, 24-hour session. The method of attack dealt with additional regulation in derivative trading, and more specifically – Credit Default Swaps. Now, I will clarify CDS’s, their influence on U.S. property, and how this new legislation will radically affect everyone from the mighty property investor to¬†fintech influencers the frequent renter.

Most critical to the housing market is the way the bill imposes derivative regulation all U.S. banks. Certain types of derivatives, Credit Default Swaps, are used by banks to hedge or protect against the possibility of default or lien loans. Essentially, CDS’s reduce some of the risk associated with providing loans, and for our purposes – mortgages. A third party will supply a lender to pay the amount left on the loan when the borrower is no longer able to make the loan payments. To create the third party prepared, the lender will pay a premium to the third party, like premium payments to insurers. Here’s an example:

Bank A decides to provide Minesh the Borrower with a 30-yr fixed mortgage of $250,000 to buy a house. Bank A can’t afford to lose $250,000 if Minesh is not able to pay, but the lender can afford to risk losing $100,000 of the principal on the mortgage. Now, since Bank A still can’t afford to eliminate the remaining $150,000, it offers to pay a third party firm $1000 every 3 months when the third party provider agrees to pay Bank A $150,000 in case that Minesh Borrower is not able to pay his mortgage. It’s much like insurance, with no insurance regulations – a means for banks to hedge against financial loss from borrower default.

The additional safety of CDS’s to our mortgage lending environment instigates and supports lending to home buyers, as mortgages shielded with CDS’s are far more likely to be issued, and therefore are more marketable for re-sale. Anything which produces mortgages more attractive, eases mortgage approval, and thereby, makes home buying more regular and attainable. In many scenarios, loans aren’t made without credit default swaps.

So, what does this mean? The extra regulation on CDS’s may remove their security net from mortgage financing, raising associated mortgage-default risk. In order to balance or decrease risk, costs to borrowers will increase. Occasionally, the absence of CDS’s will lead to this increased default risk that any prospects of bank profitability are removed, resulting in diminished mortgage applications.

Why are Credit Default Swaps the goal of legislative assault? Large corporations exposure to particular CDS’s such as AIG- America’s insurance giant- led to corrosion of corporate balance sheets. AIG sold a range of CDS’s to banks all around the world, supplying bank protection in the event of mortgage default. With almost $440 billion of coverage offered in the kind of CDS’s to banks, AIG confronted a disasters when the American people concurrently started defaulting on mortgages, as the climbing of the federal funds interest rate sparked many recently issued floating-rate mortgages to blunder. Without enough cash to keep its side of the CDS arrangement to pay for the loss on mortgage default, AIG liquidated many other, profitable assets from necessity, killing the provider’s financial well being. Not able to provide banks in demand with the guaranteed cash recuperation, and also not able to keep up the guarantee of a security blanket against default to other financial institutions sent the banking system into a frenzy. Now, banks needed to handle mortgage default reductions alone, and banks not yet facings mass defaults were forced to look elsewhere to protect their mortgage resources against defaultnonetheless, the security was significantly more expensive, thinking about the change in the perceived danger surrounding mortgages. The Bad investing of AIG funds tainted its primary line of business – insurance, requiring government intervention, too many Americans depended on insurance benefits from the giant company, requiring tax dollars to protect the insurance benefits, since the company was no longer able to procure funds elsewhere

How will all this affect the housing market?

Wave good-bye into the ease once related to CDS issuance and trading – bye, bye. Banks are no longer to engage in”risky” derivatives trading to avoid disaster exemplified by AIG – a scenario relying on taxpayers for correction. Now that banks are no longer able to cope in potentially risky derivatives trading, the government is, in essence, raising the capacity of banks to provide mortgages to anyone aside from the most capable home buyers. Effectively, banks will simply have the accessibility to approve mortgages with significant down payments (a minimum of 20 percent ) and borrowers with credit that is outstanding. Such borrowers aren’t in need of any kind of default insurance, taking into consideration the debtor’s financial strength.